NEW YORK ARCHITECTURE





NEW YORK ARCHITECTURE


Pennsylvania Station

Pennsylvania Station

The peak achievement of renowned architects McKim, Meade and White, whose design was based on the Roman Baths of Caracalla, “Penn Station” was completed in 1913. Unceremoniously torn down in 1963, the loss of this architectural masterpiece led directly to the establishment of the Landmark Preservation Society.

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

From the tall gothic arches of its towers to the raised promenade with dramatic views of the New York skyline, this renowned architectural icon has inspired generations with the simple elegance of its design and functional beauty.

World Trade Center

World Trade Center

The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were the signature feature of the lower Manhattan Skyline until an act of terrorism resulted in the total destruction of both buildings on September 11, 2001. Begun in 1966, the WTC included seven office skyscrapers and an underground shopping concourse in addition to the famous 1,368-foot tall towers, which remained the world’s tallest buildings until 1974.

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

Join us for a photographic journey of one of America’s most iconic monuments, from the ancient origins of its design to her post on Liberty Island standing watch over New York Harbor.

Radio City Music Hall

Radio City Music Hall

Opening on December 27, 1932 as part of Rockefeller Center, this magnificent Art Deco theatre was designated a New York City landmark in 1978.  Generations of audiences have been entertained by the Music Hall’s famous pipe organ, Rockettes and Christmas Spectacular.

Empire State Building

Empire State Building

Although no longer the world’s tallest building, The Empire State still holds title as New York City’s essential skyscraper. Taking less than a year to build, and opening its doors in the heart of the great depression, the Empire State Building remains a cultural icon and one of New York’s most popular tourist destinations.

Grand Central Terminal

Grand Central Terminal

Spared from demolition and now restored to its original beauty, this 1913 Beaux Arts masterpiece remains one of New York’s most famous transportation landmarks.

Ellis Island

Ellis Island

It is estimated that over 12 million people passed through Ellis Island, from the time it opened in 1892 through the year 1954 when the last immigrant passed through its door. Join us for a photo tour of this iconic New York landmark that represents America’s rich cultural heritage.

Central Park

Central Park

A masterpiece of landscape design by Fredrick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, Central park has offered New Yorker’s a treasured respite from the daily bustle of Manhattan life ever since the first tree was planted in 1858.

Chrysler Building

Chrysler Building

At Seventy-seven stories high and topped with a 185-foot stainless steel spire, the Chrysler Building held the title of the world’s tallest building for less than a year when it was eclipsed by the Empire State Building. Built in 1930 and a masterpiece of Art Deco ornamentation, the Chrysler Building remains one of New York’s most iconic structures.

Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building

Completed in 1902, at 20 stories high the Flatiron building was one of the tallest buildings in New York City. Located at the intersection of Fifth Avenue, Broadway and East 22nd Street, the building is known for its wedge shape, required by the triangular building lot where it was built. The Flatiron is an iconic New York building, attaining both United States and New York City Landmark status.

Rockefeller Center

Rockefeller Center

Covering 22 acres of midtown Manhattan, and named for John D. Rockefeller Jr. who privately undertook this project during the Great Depression, Rockefeller Center is a tour de force of Art Deco architecture, sculpture and artwork. Famous for its Christmas tree, skating rink and music hall, this National Historic Landmark remains one of New York’s most favorite attractions.

Coney Island

Coney Island

Steeped in Brooklyn folklore, Coney Island is a traditional New York attraction famous for its Board walk, arcades and sea-side attractions. The area boasts of three landmarks that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places; the Wonder Wheel - Ferris Wheel built in 1918, the Cyclone roller coaster and the Parachute Jump, the latter two transplanted from the 1939 NY Word’s Fair.

New York City Subway Tiles

New York City Subway Tiles

A visual treat for New York subway riders are the colorful ceramic plaques and mosaic designs that inform and decorate the various platforms, posts and station walls.   Much of the surviving examples of this work have remained in place since the original NYC subway system opened in 1904. This program will feature a photo-tour of the most notable examples of this beautiful artwork.

NY World’s Fair: 1939-40

NY World’s Fair: 1939-40

Opening on April 30, 1939, The New York World’s Fair featured exhibits by 58 nations and 33 states as well as 1,354 exhibitors and 310 places to eat.  With the theme “Building the World of Tomorrow with the Tools of Today” this two-year event forged lasting memories for all who experienced it.

NY World’s Fair: 1964-65

NY World’s Fair: 1964-65

Dominated by the 12-story high stainless steel “Unisphere”, the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair’s theme was “Peace Through Understanding”, dedicated to “Man’s Achievement on a Shrinking Globe in an Ever-Expanding Universe”

Times Square

Times Square

Located in the heart of New York City, Times Square is world famous for its huge billboards, stores and restaurants. On New Year’s Eve in 1907 crowds gathered there to witness New York’s first “ball drop”, a tradition that continues to this today, and a celebration that draws over one million people annually. 

Manhattan Bridge

Manhattan Bridge

Just north of the Brooklyn Bridge with its stone Gothic Arch towers, the Manhattan Bridge opened to traffic on December 31, 1909. Designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark in 2009, the span is noted for its distinctive all steel towers and classical architecture, featuring a Baroque Arch at the Canal Street entrance.

The Cloisters

The Cloisters

The Cloisters were excavated from French monasteries in the 1930’s and reconstructed on their present site in the Washington Heights section of upper Manhattan.  This Romanesque and Gothic style landmark is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and now serves as a museum of European architecture and sculpture.

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral

A mid-Manhattan landmark and seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, St. Patrick’s Cathedral is located directly across the street from Rockefeller Center, it’s twin Neo-Gothic spires rising to a soaring height of over 325 feet above 5th Avenue.

Tappan Zee Bridge/ Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge

Tappan Zee Bridge/ Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge

Opening to traffic on December 15, 1955, the “Tappan Zee” is a span crossing the Hudson river between South Nyack in Rockland County NY and Tarrytown in Westchester County NY. A prime example of the deficiencies of America’s aging infrastructure, the Tappan Zee has been carrying traffic loads far past its intended capacity for decades. In 2013 construction began on a new Tappan Zee replacement bridge consisting of 2 parallel spans that are scheduled for completion in 2018.

Croton Aqueduct System

Croton Aqueduct System

At its time of building in the late 19th century this extensive system of dams, reservoirs and aqueducts was one of the most notable engineering achievements of its day.  In order to meet the current fresh water needs of over 8 million New Yorkers, the development of this pipeline has continued into the 21st century.

Long Island Sound

Long Island Sound

Voyaged by generations of sailors and fishermen, Long Island Sound is about 98 nautical miles in length. At its eastern end, the Sound opens into the sea past Montauk. Traveling west, it narrowly tapers into the tidal straight of Hell Gate. A back door maritime route to New York City, the Sound’s brackish waters insure that this body of water will remain one of the nation’s most notable producers of fresh shellfish.

General Grant National Memorial

General Grant National Memorial

General Grant National Memorial, aka. Grant’s Tomb is picturesquely sited on a rise along the Hudson River in upper Manhattan. A classical domed mausoleum, the memorial is the final resting place of the 18th President of the United States Ulysses S. Grant and his wife Julia Grant.

George Washington Bridge

George Washington Bridge

At 3,500 feet in length, the George Washington Bridge captured the title of the “World’s Longest Suspension Bridge” upon its completion in 1931. More than 54 million eastbound vehicles cross this majestic span each year.

The High Line

The High Line

The “High Line” is a one and a half mile long elevated railway line near the “Meatpacking District” on the Lower West Side of Manhattan. This long unused section of railway sat derelict and overgrown for decades and was slated for demolition. In 2006 work began re-purposing the structure as an urban park and today the High Line is an on-trend destination for locals and tourists, drawing near 5 million visitors annually.

Levittown

Levittown

Located on Long Island’s Nassau County, Levittown derives its name from its builder, Levitt & Sons Inc. A response to the scarcity of housing immediately following World War II, Levittown was the first mass-produced suburb and served as a model for similar developments throughout the United States.

Fulton Fish Market

Fulton Fish Market

Opening in 1822, the Fulton Fish Market was located near the Brooklyn Bridge on the East River in Lower Manhattan.  Relocating in 2005 to its present site at Hunts Point in the Bronx, the market remains the largest fresh fish wholesaler on the East Coast of the United States.

Queensboro Bridge

Queensboro Bridge

Since its opening in 1909, the Queensboro Bridge has towered majestically over New York’s East River at Roosevelt Island, remaining an essential link between Long Island and Manhattan’s fashionable Upper East Side.

One World Trade Center

One World Trade Center

Sometimes referred to as “The Freedom Tower,” One World Trade Center stands on the northwest corner of the original World Trade Center Site which was destroyed on September 11, 2001. Opening on November 3, 2014, the building reaches a total height of 1,776 feet tall, making it the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the sixth-tallest in the world.

The Dakota Apartments

The Dakota Apartments

Built in 1884, “The Dakota” remains one of Manhattan’s most exclusive addresses. Located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West, the Dakota boasts a long list of notable and famous residents, including John Lennon who was slain in front of the building in December of 1980.

NYC Subway System

NYC Subway System

Preceded only by the opening of the London Railway System in 1863, the first “Rapid Transit System” in New York City began carrying passengers in 1868. Consisting of the IRT (Interboro Rapid Transit Company), the BRT (Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company) and the IND (Independent Subway System), it remains the most extensive in the world, with 714 miles of track, 468 stations and 6,241 subway cars in use.

The Bronx

The Bronx

The Northernmost borough of New York City, this program will feature the history of, and the sights and attractions of   The Bronx.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

The nation’s 3rd largest city for nearly half a century, Brooklyn became part of New York City in 1898 and has remained its most populated borough.  Boasting 65 miles of natural shoreline and 5959 acres of parkland, Brooklyn has retained its unique identity through its diverse cultural neighborhoods and educational institutions.  

A History of Lower Manhattan

A History of Lower Manhattan

Covering the areas from Wall Street to Battery Park, this program will highlight the cultural and architectural history of lower Manhattan from its Dutch Colonial roots to its present-day status as the Financial Capital of the World.